Point


Point
The smallest unit of price change quoted or, one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: minimum price fluctuation and tick. The New York Times Financial Glossary

* * *

I. point point 1 [pɔɪnt] noun [countable]
1. a single idea, opinion, or fact, especially one that is part of a plan, argument, or discussion:

• That's a very interesting point.

• I agree with your point about the importance of safety.

• Hemade the point that economic growth would create the wealth necessary to protect the environment.

2. a level on a scale:

• Gas prices have reached their highest point so far this year.

• The president's approval rating has hit its lowest point.

ˈprice point MARKETING COMMERCE
the price that a company decides to sell a product for, on a scale of possible prices :

• It is always important to pick the correct price point.

3. the point the main idea in something that is said or done which gives meaning to all of it:

The point is that staff are not allowed to smoke in the building.

• Have I completely missed the point (= failed to understand the main meaning of something ) ?

4. one of a series of parts into which a meeting, plan etc is divided:

• What's the first point on the agenda?

• The corporation announced a five-point plan for overhauling its businesses.

ˈaction ˌpoint
something that you decide must be done, especially after a meeting or after studying something carefully:

• We drew up a list of action points arising from the interview.

5. FINANCE a unit of measure used in Indexes (= series of figures giving the general level of financial markets, economic activity etc ) :

• The Financial Times 30 Share Index closed up 11 points at 1659.5.

ˈbasis ˌpoint
FINANCE a measurement of the interest rate on bonds. One basis point is one hundredth of one percent:

• The price of New York City bonds should go up by no more than about 10 basis points in next Wednesday's sale.

perˈcentage ˌpoint FINANCE
one percent, used as a unit of measure when talking about changes or differences in interest rates:

• The Bank of Japan cut the rate by half a percentage point, to 4% (= from 4.5% to 4% ) .

6. a place or position:

• Your luggage will be searched at the point of departure.

• Visas cannot be issued at the entry points along the border.

asˈsembly ˌpoint
the place where people should go to if there is a fire or other emergency
7. an exact moment, time, or stage in the development or progress of something:

• It is too early to tell whether last month's increase marks a turning point (= a time when a situation changes ) for the company.

• The economy seems to be moving to the point of no return (= the point where it becomes so bad it cannot recover ) .

ˈbreak-even ˌpoint FINANCE ACCOUNTING
the level of sales at which the income from goods sold is just enough to cover the costs of production so that neither a profit nor a loss is being made:

• The service's break-even point is around 3,500 subscribers.

inˈflection ˌpoint COMMERCE ECONOMICS
a time when there is an important change in a business or industry:

• The business has reached an inflection point, and we may even see a drop in profits over the next financial year.

reˈorder ˌpoint MANUFACTURING
the point when it is necessary to order more of a product, taking into account the demand for the product, and the time it takes to deliver it
ˈtrigger ˌpoint
1. FINANCE the number of shares in a company above which a shareholder is forced to take a particular course of action. For example, if the shareholder has 30% of the shares in a company, it is forced to make an offer for the remaining shares:

• We can accumulate more shares up to the trigger point.

2. COMMERCE the price below which an imported product must fall before trade restrictions are put on it
8. a unit used to measure how good someone or something is or how suitable they are for something:

• The details you give are assessed according to a points system.

9. a particular quality or feature that something or someone has:

• Finance has never been his strong point.

• Every system has its good points and its drawbacks.

ˈselling ˌpoint MARKETING
a feature of a product that makes it sell well:

• A selling point for houses around here is the amazing lake view.

uˌnique ˈselling ˌpoint also uˌnique ˈselling propoˌsition abbreviation USP MARKETING
a feature of a product that no other similar products have, used in advertising etc to try to persuade people to buy it:

• Finding a unique selling point for banking services is not easy.

10. spoken a sign (.) used to separate a whole number from any Decimals that follow it — see also bullet point
  [m0] II. point point 2 verb
1. point the finger (at somebody) to blame someone for something:

• To minimise his sentence, he pointed the finger at people he had dealt with.

2. point the way to show how something could change or develop successfully:

• The article summarises the current law and points the way forward.

point something ↔ out phrasal verb [transitive]
to tell someone something they did not already know or had not thought about:

• Some economists have pointed out that low inflation is not necessarily a good thing.

point to something phrasal verb [transitive]
to mention something because you think it is important:

• He pointed to the seventy million dollars he had made for the firm.

point to/​towards something phrasal verb [transitive]
if something points to a fact, it makes it seem very likely that it is true:

• The economy's performance in April pointed toward a recovery in the manufacturing sector.

point something ↔ up phrasal verb [transitive]
to make something seem more important or noticeable:

• The latest economic figures point up the failure of the government's policies.

* * *

   Price movements are expressed in terms of points.
   ► See also Pip.

* * *

Ⅰ.
point UK US /pɔɪnt/ noun
[C] an idea, opinion, or piece of information that is spoken or written: »

I agree with your point about the management team.

»

Thank you, that was a very interesting point.

make/raise a/the point »

He made the point quite forcefully that no more money was available.

get a point across »

I wasn't sure what point she was trying to get across.

prove sb's point »

I think that proves my point. The figures just don't stack up.

the point — Cf. the point
[U or S] purpose, or the fact of something being useful: no point (in doing sth) »

There is no point in discussing this further if you've already made up your mind.

[C] a particular detail or characteristic of a person or thing: the main points »

I noted down the main points of his speech.

good/bad point »

The government's financial plan has both its good and its bad points.

»

When you are appraising someone, try to emphasize their good points.

»

Speaking in public is not one of her strong points.

[C] MEETINGS one part that a meeting, plan, etc. is divided into: »

We have seven points on the agenda today.

»

Has anyone any comments on Point 4?

»

We need to examine the proposals point by point.

»

My boss gave me a five-point plan for improving my performance.

[C] a particular time or stage that is reached in a process: highest/lowest point »

Copper prices rose to their highest point in two weeks.

»

The stock went to $74 at one point.

get to/reach a/the point »

It's taken us years to get to the point where we're making a reasonable profit.

»

We shall need to discuss this further at some point.

at this point (in time) »

This is not something that we want to introduce at this point in time.

[C] a mark or unit for counting or measuring something: score points »

You will normally be accepted if you score more than 20 points on the test.

»

The bond rose 10 basis points, from 2.932 to 2.942 percent.

»

Interest rates have gone up two percentage points.

»

We will introduce an Australian-style points system for work permits.

[C] a particular place: »

The building served as the group's meeting point.

»

The store is the focal point of the small community.

[C] a small round mark that is used in numbers to separate whole numbers from parts of numbers: »

A kilogram equals two point two (2.2) pounds.

»

a decimal point

I take your point — Cf. I take your point
make a point of doing sth — Cf. make a point of doing sth
make your point — Cf. make your point
to the point — Cf. to the point
up to a point — Cf. up to a point
See also ACTION POINT(Cf. ↑action point), ASSEMBLY POINT(Cf. ↑assembly point), BASIS POINT(Cf. ↑basis point), BREAK-EVEN POINT(Cf. ↑break-even point), BREAKING POINT(Cf. ↑breaking point), BREAKPOINT(Cf. ↑breakpoint), BULLET POINT(Cf. ↑bullet point), GROSS RATING POINT(Cf. ↑gross rating point), HALF POINT(Cf. ↑half point), INFLECTION POINT(Cf. ↑inflection point), ORDER POINT(Cf. ↑order point), PERCENTAGE POINT(Cf. ↑percentage point), PRICE POINT(Cf. ↑price point), QUARTER-POINT(Cf. ↑quarter-point), RATINGS POINT(Cf. ↑ratings point), REORDER POINT(Cf. ↑reorder point), SELLING POINT(Cf. ↑selling point), STRATEGIC INFLECTION POINT(Cf. ↑strategic inflection point), TALKING POINT(Cf. ↑talking point), TIPPING POINT(Cf. ↑tipping point), TRIGGER POINT(Cf. ↑trigger point), TURNING POINT(Cf. ↑turning point), UNIQUE SELLING POINT(Cf. ↑unique selling point)
Ⅱ.
point UK US /pɔɪnt/ verb [I or T]
to show someone the direction that they should go, or what they should do: »

The figures pointed us in the direction that we should be taking over the next year or so.

point the finger at sb — Cf. point the finger at sb

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • point — 1. (poin ; le t se lie : un poin t important ; au pluriel, l s se lie : des points z importants) s. m. 1°   Douleur qui point, qui pique. 2°   Piqûre que l on fait dans l étoffe avec une aiguille enfilée d un fil. 3°   Nom donné à certains… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Point — Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Point — may refer to the following: Contents 1 Business and finance 2 Engineering 3 Entertainment …   Wikipedia

  • Point — hat verschiedene Urspünge: Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Bedeutung im Deutschen 2 Verwendung in Begriffen französischen und englischen Ursprungs 3 Einzelnachweise 4 Si …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • point — [point] n. [OFr, dot, prick < L punctum, dot, neut. of punctus, pp. of pungere, to prick (< IE base * peuĝ , *peuk̑, to prick, jab > Ger fichte, spruce tree, L pugil, boxer, pugnus, fist); also < OFr pointe, sharp end < ML puncta… …   English World dictionary

  • point — n 1: a particular detail, proposition, or issue of law; specif: point of error 2: any of various incremental units used in measuring, fixing, or calculating something: as a: a unit used in calculating a sentence by various factors (as aggravating …   Law dictionary

  • point — ► NOUN 1) the tapered, sharp end of a tool, weapon, or other object. 2) a particular spot, place, or moment. 3) an item, detail, or idea in a discussion, text, etc. 4) (the point) the most significant or relevant factor or element. 5) advantage… …   English terms dictionary

  • point — Point, ou Poinct, Sermoni vernaculo additur ad maiorem negationis expressionem. Je n iray point, id est, Non ibo, quasi dicas, Ne punctum quidem progrediar vt eam illo. Il n y est poinct, id est, Non est illic, quasi illius ne punctum quidem ibi… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Point — (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Point — 〈[ poɛ̃:] m. 6〉 1. 〈Kart.〉 Stich 2. 〈Würfelspiel〉 Auge [frz., „Punkt“ <lat. punctum, „Punkt, Stich“] * * * Point [po̯ɛ̃: ], der; s, s [frz. point < lat. punctum, ↑ Punkt]: 1. a) …   Universal-Lexikon

  • point — [n1] speck bit, count, dot, fleck, flyspeck, full stop, iota, mark, minim, mite, mote, notch, particle, period, scrap, stop, tittle, trace; concepts 79,831 point [n2] specific location locality, locus, place, position, site, situation, spot,… …   New thesaurus


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